Fish in the Grand Canal


Crayfish Bream
Perch
Carp
Pike
Tench

 


Crayfish
The Crayfish has no backbone, and although it is the largest invertebrate in Irish freshwaters, most people have never seen it. This is probably due to its shyness by day, and the result is that its distribution in Ireland is very poorly known. One of the first people to discover them first in the Grand Canal was Dick Warner.
He told us he discovered them in the Grand Canal in the 1960's. Crayfish live in streams, lakes and rivers and canals in Ireland and prefer lime-rich water, though they may also live elsewhere. They hide by day under stones or weed and at night they crawl out to feed on dead leaves and plants, and in addition they may feed on insects and worms.

 

 

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Bream
Deep-bodied, large-scaled bream like the still and slow flowing waters of the canal. They feed on small water animals such as insect larvae and on some water plants. The largest bream reach a length of about 80cm and weigh about 4.5kg. The 'stripe' along a fish's side, is called the lateral line. It is a groove of specialised tissue that detects vibrations in the water, in effect allowing the fish to 'hear' and 'feel' water movements.




 

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Perch
Markings on the flanks camouflage perch among waterweeds. These five or so vertical bars, the front dorsal fin which has prominent spines and the reddish other fins, mark out the perch as an exceptionally handsome fish. When fully grown they may weigh 2 kg. Perch feed on worms, snails, slugs, insects and small fish.

 

 




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Carp
The carp has a mouth inferior with thick lips and two pair of barbels, one pair long. It has a forked tail fin, a dorsal fin long, a barbed bony ray in the origin of the dorsal and of the anal fin. There are several varieties which differ considerably in scaling and in the height of body. These include wild carp, king carp, mirror carp and leather carp. Carp grow to over 40 lb.

 

 

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Pike
The pike is another species of fish which is often found in the waters of the Grand Canal. It has a voracious nature and is a sleek predator with a mouthful of sharp teeth. It is a very popular fish for fishermen to catch.

 

 

 

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Tench
Tiny scales, a greenish sheen, an almost unforked tail, and a bulky muscular body characterises this still-water, bottom-feeding member of the carp family. A good-sized tench weighs around 4 kg and is a powerful fighter when hooked.

 

 

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For more information on fish by the Grand Canal go to the Fish Ireland website.

To find the resources to go with this page click here.

To find a Wordsearch to go with this page click here.

 

Ms. Dillon's 4th class provided the information for this page.